Trauma (the book)

 Today I received TRAUMA, a beautiful and very personal gift from Austrian painter Christian Bazant-Hegemark, for which I am deeply grateful. The volume spans fifteen years and tells the story of searching for a visual language dealing with trauma.

I was surprised how many of the paintings and drawings I still knew from my time in Vienna, some of which even appear in portraits I took in 2013....   READ MORE

Dachstein Retreat

posted in: Landscape, Lifestyle, Outdoor, Photography | 0

Im Herbst 2014 hatten Julia und ich das große Glück, am Dachstein ein Retreat mit Coach und Trainer Hans-Peter Beingrübl von Pushkar Nature verbringen zu können. Sein großes Wissen und seine reiche Erfahrung ruht in seiner allgemeinen Entspanntheit, so dass sich in einem wirklich angenehmen Rahmen ein paar erstaunliche Dinge in Gang setzten.

Nach einer Nacht im Freien ohne Zelt und einer von Apfelstrudel und Freundlichkeit geprägten Nacht auf der Gjaid bei Isi, Hannes und Indra, einer Tour fast auf den Gjaidstein, viel Nebel, einem weiten Blick vom Zwölferkogel und vor der Kulisse des wunderschönen Dachsteingipfels reiften weitreichende Entscheidungen. Und als wir wieder hervorkamen aus dem Gebirgsnebel stand am Ende der Satz »Ich kündige!«. ...   READ MORE

Jördis Tielsch: Virtueller Hut im Lÿz

posted in: Commission, Event, Photography | 0

Am Samstag, 28. April 2020 spielte Jördis Tielsch gemeinsam mit Peter Schneider ein Benefizkonzert im Kulturhaus Lÿz.

Möglich wurde die Veranstaltung trotz Corona dank des virtuellen Hutes – einer Initiative, die zusammen mit dem Kulturbüro des Kreises Siegen-Wittgenstein lokale Künstler und Kulturschaffende unterstützt und in Zeiten des Kontaktverbots heimische Kultur in die Siegerländer Wohnzimmer bringt....   READ MORE

Possible Worlds

posted in: On the Road, Photography | 0

In a possible world I would live in the old family farm by the forest. I’d have a wood fired oven, plenty of vegetables and fruit from the garden and more space in- and outside the house than I could possibly fill. I would eat my home baked bread for breakfast in the old chicken yard while enjoying the most stunning view over the Weser-valley.

I’d also have had an idea why I would and could live in the sticks, I’d have had another idea that would fill ex-barn and ex-stable with something sensible – preferably something sensible and income-generating so it would provide me with yet another idea on how to pay for maintenance of the gigantic roof....   READ MORE

Telephone Boxes

posted in: On the Road, Photography | 0

For several years I have been taking pictures of a dying breed: telephone boxes.
at_wien_u4karlsplatz_201512
While some of the boxes have been upgraded to non-box shapes with huge screens and WiFi, many are in a sad state and some even stripped of their primary function. The variety of shapes and types of boxes and telephones even in a single country is astonishing and even the gutted ones continue to serve as advertising space, rain shelters, smoking rooms and toilets for various kinds of animals.

KUNSTFORUM Publication

posted in: Infringement, Photography, Publication | 0

KUNSTFORUM International 230 (2014), p 127.

A short while after my last portrait session with Marianne Vlaschits, KUNSTFORUM International did an interview with her and two fellow artists and she used one of my portraits to go with the interview....   READ MORE

When Inspiration Strikes

posted in: On Creativity, Photography | 0

 

When asked whether he wrote on a schedule or only when struck by inspiration, Somerset Maugham allegedly replied:

I write only when inspiration strikes.

 

Fortunately it strikes every morning at nine o’clock sharp.

The 500 Birds

posted in: On Creativity, Photography | 0

 

»It’s the 499 birds before the 1 that works.« (Alexia Sinclair/via)

or, in the words of Jacob Riis:

When nothing seems to help, I go look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not that blow that did it, but all that had gone before. (via)

Amsterdam Family Portrait

posted in: Commission, Photography, Portrait | 0

Earlier this year my dear friend Nic had asked if I would be interested in shooting a portrait of his family. Since they live some 1200 km away, the crucial question for me was not so much if but more when. Then, in early September, I was in the vicinity (meaning: only 400 km away), and spontaneously opted for the detour to pay a long overdue visit to Amsterdam – and also finally meet their daughter.

I did not have my gear with me and there only was an hour left in between the idea to go for the shoot and me having to be through the door for the train station, so in order to put the opportunity to good use we had to move fast and I had to borrow Marlene’s old Canon. Of course time was even scarcer after the usual displacement of furniture had taken place, and the combination of time pressure, borrowed equipment and a different camera maker resulted in a couple of technical blunders on my part, but we all had a fun time and in the end were pretty pleased with the results.

Tilt Shit

posted in: Photography | 1

I wanted to try using a tilt/shift lens for a long time. I don’t particularly love the miniature effect, but I really like what Gregory Heisler is doing to the focal plane by tilting and I thought shifting would be great for architecture. So the other day I grabbed an old 50mm f/1.9, a body cap, black molton and a heated paper clip. I used the paper clip to cut the body cap open and the glue (obviously) to glue it all together.

To be honest, I was a bit stumped when, after my first test shots, I realised that I had also created a macro lens by considerably increasing the focal length. Thus, this now is my tilt-shit-lens.

Los que me acogieron

posted in: Commission, Photography, Portrait | 0

My friend and colleague Doc Babel not only taught me rudimentary Spanish, he and his wife also provided me with a home in Munich during the last few years, which made many things easier than they easily could have been.

And now that it’s their turn to look for a new home, they pack some aluminum boxes bound for South America and thought that some decent head shots would make their new start easier. I was of course more than happy to provide that part of their luggage....   READ MORE

Hochschwab Hiking

posted in: Landscape, On the Road, Outdoor, Photography | 0

Second time Hochschwab, second time no summit. This time better pictures, though.

In late May, I started in Präbichl and, through considerable amounts of snow, made my way up to the Sonnschienhütte where I had the dorm all to myself. Unfortunately, I had my eyes at the wrong place at the wrong time and so I fell and injured my finger. Thus, instead of summiting the Hochschwab the next day, I went down to Tragöß (via Grüner See) – and straight into hospital where the trip ended with an »Eintrittsaufforderung«. Luckily nothing serious came to light in Koje 1, but damn you Hochschwab, next time I do want a summit. Please.

Cumberland Studios: Marianne Vlaschits & Mirjam Schweiger

posted in: Editorial, On Creativity, Photography | 0

Die Künstlerinnen und Künstler standen kurz vor dem unfreiwilligen Auszug aus Ihren Wohnungen und Studios in der Wiener Cumberlandstraße, als Marianne Vlaschits und Mirjam Schweiger “$chwanger” Schweiger mich am 4. Juli 2014 in ihre Ateliers einluden.

Automatically batch rename photo files

posted in: Linux Archives, Photography | 0

Following Robert Seale’s advice, I was looking for a solution to batch rename photo files. After my last shoot I used digikam and while the results were as desired, it took a second or more per image, which I thought a bit long. After not finding a different suitable solution I asked the question on unix.stackexchange and was overwhelmed by two people’s in-depth answers. I learned a lot from both mikserv and Gilles and in the end settled with Gilles’ suggestion. I take zero credit for the solution, I don’t even understand parts of what is going on, but I amended it a little bit nonetheless and thought the extended version might help someone.*

Preliminaries

What I get when I come home is file names looking like this: _DSC1234.NEF. What I wanted instead was

  1. date-shot in YYYYMMDD-format plus
  2. a descriptive shoot-name plus
  3. image-number

looking like this: 20140708_WeddingAdamAndEve_0001.NEF

There are a few issues with this:

ad 1. Date Shot: sometimes I can only copy and rename the files a few days after shooting, so the date should reflect the date the picture was taken, not the date it was copied. Getting date-shot from the file itself is difficult as there is no birth time recorded. The closest is mtime which is the time the file’s content has last been modified. However, creation date is stored in image file’s EXIF data.

ad 2: Name of Shoot: Ideally I wanted this to be a variable I could set as a parameter when calling the script.

ad 3. Number of Image: This should reflect the age of the image with the oldest one having the lowest number. The problem is that cameras usually restart numbering at  0000 once they hit  9999. So images n-9999 can potentially be older than 0000-n. I needed a solution that would cater for this special case.

 

The code

# original solution by @Gilles (http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/141138/)

# set base path and navigate to "basepath + parameter 1"
BASEPATH='/media/data/photo/';
cd $BASEPATH$1

# add "EXIF creation time" as prefix to original file names
exiv2 mv -r %Y%m%d-%H%M%S:basename: *.NEF
# Now we have files with names like 20140630-235958_DSC1234.NEF.

# final rename
i=10000
for x in *.NEF; do
   i=$((i+1))
   mv "$x" "${x%-*}_$2-${i#1}_Copyright-Jan-Soehlke.NEF"
done

 

Walkthrough

Line 4: Here we set our base path. We choose the highest directory ever useed to store pictures.

Line 5: Navigate to base path + parameter 1. If our script is called rename and the pictures are in /media/data/photo/weddings/adam+eve, then we call the script through

./rename weddings/adam+eve

Line 8: In a first iteration we add EXIF-creation time as a prefix to the original file names. We use exiv2 for this operation. -r is for rename and we use YYYYMMDD-hhmmss, which is %Y%m%d-%H%M%S in strftime(3), plus :basename: to keep the original filename after the time stamp.

Through creation time as a prefix we now sort files by age, even if the files would sort differently by name. This could happen if during a shoot we reach 9999 and the camera’s counter continues at 0000 or if we shot with two different cameras.

By also retaining the original file name for now, we make sure that in case there are multiple files with the same time stamp, they still have individual names. EXIF time’s finest unit is a second, so if we fire bursts of images (Nikon’s D4s for example shoots at 11 frames/second), we have multiple files with the same creation date and thus potentially 11 files with the same name.

Line 12: The counter variable i counts from 10000 and is used with the leading 1 digit stripped; this is a trick to get the leading zeros so that all counter values have the same number. If you want more (or less) than four digits, set i accordingly.

Line 15: ${x%-*} removes everything that follows the - character, in our case it is hours, minutes and seconds as well as the original filename. ${i#1} writes the new four digit file number.

$2 provides a second variable, which we use for the shoot name. In this case we want it to be WeddingAdamAndEve, so we call the script through

./rename weddings/adam+eve WeddingAdamAndEve

Finally, I added _Copyright-Jan-Soehlke. It not only reminds someone who downloads the file that it is indeed copyrighted, it also helps with SEO as my name is automatically associated with each image I upload.

 

Possible Problems

a) The original file names already have a - in place. In this case change the  - in line 8 to something different (like _) and use the same character in the ${x%-*}-part in line 15 (in this case ${x%_*}, otherwise the script will not work as intended.

b) A burst of images reaches across the 9999/0000-mark. These specific files will not be in order after renaming – but they weren’t in order in the first place, so I have no idea how to tackle this rare scenario other than by setting your camera’s counter to reset to 0000 after each formatting.

c) Your files do not contain EXIF data. In this case see mikeserv’s solution which uses a different angle of attack and is thoroughly and well explained.

 

___________________________

* Stackexchange uses the CC-BY-SA license, so all the code in this example is naturally also CC-BY-SA.

Failing Better with Marianne Vlaschits

posted in: Editorial, Photography, Portrait | 1

Last year in March I shot a portrait of Marianne Vlaschits for »Project 12 pt. II«, so we thought we’d do another one for the first anniversary. My original plan was to recreate her neon-pictures from the Blue Crystal Fire-series (see here), but what can I say? I completely and utterly failed. From white cardboard and stuff lying around on location I built what I deemed to be perfect neon light replacements, yet the effect was completely different at best and not at all visible most of the time.

Once again I learned that photography sometimes is like cooking: when you want to try something exciting for the first time, don’t do it in the presence of important guests. But I also learned that in Marianne’s presence, failing means that in the end it still is going to be an awesome afternoon resulting in pictures we both like – good to work with a professional. And just like Beckett writes: »Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.«

I am also happy about the three derivative works that came from the shoot: a portrait of the photographer by Marianne (seen in pictures 4 + 5); a Feiyue »Vlaschits Edition« by me (from slipping on paint) and »Painting the Artist« by Hyo Lee.

And despite my clumsiness (that not only led to Feiyue »Vlaschits« but also saw a falling SB 800 just miss Marianne’s head), the Comme des Garçons-robe Marianne’s neighbour and fashion designer Thomas van der Jeught gave us in his infinite trust stayed clean.

Next Monday (23.6.2014) at the Archiv für Gegenwart (Mühlfeldgasse 5, 1020 Wien) you have the opportunity to see Marianne Vlaschits – who by the way is also responsible for the highly acclaimed cover art of Hercules and Love Affair’s latest album The Feast of the Broken Heart.

 

Determine Your Rates

posted in: Photography, Publication | 5

I recently had an issue with a newspaper using one of my images without permission (see here). When I tried to determine how much I could/should charge, I discovered a few lists and thanks to Manuela Schwendener, who sent several more yesterday, I now have these for future reference:

Germany

Austria

Switzerland

 

Infringing for MSF

posted in: Infringement, Photography, Publication | 0

Several weeks ago I learned that Austrian newspaper Niederösterreichische Nachrichten without permission had printed a portrait I took of painter Christian Bazant-Hegemark – my first real copyright infringement case.

Christian Bazant Hegemark shot by Jan Söhlke – Crop from Niederösterreichische Nachrichten

I pondered and wondered what to do – since I did not yet start a formal business as a photographer, I did not know whether or not I could just bill them – and if so: how much? Also, I feared the conundrum that would possibly result from it regarding my taxes: billing would once again give me a »world income«, additionally complicating matters by being employed as a researcher in Germany plus effectively becoming a self employed photographer in Austria. I figured I needed a lawyer, yet despite soon learning that the Rechtsanwaltskammer is offering free first advice, I did not find (= make) the time going there.

Then I read »Would You Die For The Photo?« by Chase Jarvis (warning: graphic images), it led me to war photographer James Nachtwey’s talk at TED where he mentions working with Médecins Sans Frontières. Their work and courage impress me a lot. I also remembered that whenever a corporation uses a Tom Waits song for advertising, he sues them to then donate all the money he receives.

I thought I should try the same thing (if on a much smaller scale) and posted a registered letter a week ago, requesting a donation of EUR 150,– to MSF in my name. And voilà, today I receive this:

Spendenbeleg »Médecins sans Frontières«

According to MSF, 150 EUR buy food for 15 malnourished children for two weeks or treatment for 300 children with pneumonia or 6 weeks basic medical services for 400 refugees. Donations can be made here.

Project 12R: February

posted in: 12, Lifestyle, Photography, Portrait | 0

In March »Office« was the topic for our second portrait. We went scouting at Caritas Mall »Carla« (first three images). Thanks to the generosity of the employees there, we obtained permission to shoot there during the hour before they opened the doors to the masses.

Three days later, we showed up with enthusiasm, a general idea of what to shoot, loads of gear and little time. Once more: »don’t let good light ruin your picture«. When there is no time, one really only has two options: either everything needs to be checked and nailed down before the shoot or one has to KISS (keep it simple, stupid). Otherwise much of the positive energy is eaten by all the wrong things (an SB800 under a vow of silence for instance). Consequently, we picked a test shot as the final picture from when we were both still relaxed and hadn’t set up the light.

World’s Largest Mobile Camera

posted in: On Creativity, Photography | 0

Ian Ruhter made his own camera – by mounting a lens to the rear end of a truck. What impressed me most is how, despite the scale of his instrument, it is so little about the gear and so much about the process. Everybody is excited to be part of the shoot and thus his alchemy reaches far beyond the outdated collodion-process.

This video introduces him:

 

Here you can see him work at his »American Dream« series:

 

In this clip about Madison (who was born weighing only 800g) he also uses his »time machine« for film:

 

Ian was a guest at Chase Jarvis Live (you can see what is going on inside the camera from 1h38m35s):

 

Images are on Ian’s website and his tumblr.

 

 

 

 

 

Hanover by Night

posted in: Architecture, On the Road, Travel | 0

In January I went to Hanover. While my wife attended a conference, I took care of our new born daughter and walked around quite a bit, morning to night. I grew up in the area and always thought of Hanover as by far the ugliest potato in the bag of post-war architecture – Max Goldt once claimed that »every German city has a bit of Hanover«. The city suffered a lot from bombings and after the war people quickly rebuilt it, aesthetics clearly towards the end on the list of their priorities.
Yet, this time I was surprised to discover some really pretty areas, both pre- and post-war. Here are a couple of b/w shots of pretty Hanover by night:

 

Gerd Ludwig at NHM

posted in: On the Road, Photography | 0

Last Wednesday the »Long Shadow of Chernobyl« exhibition opened at the Natural History Museum in Vienna. During several visits to Chernobyl, National Geographic photographer Gerd Ludwig documented the people, the remains of the plant and life in the exclusion zone (see a short video here and more content here).

Thanks to the generosity of NHM’s communication department, I was lucky enough to receive an invitation for the opening function/book presentation last Tuesday. Apart from recommending to go and see the exhibition (until September) I took away some food for thought from the opening talks.

Constructive Overlapping

Christian Köberl, the museum’s director, explained how the Natural History Museum – an institution that is widely associated with stuffed animals and a vast collection of rocks – came to host an exhibition covering a problem that is clearly man-made. He linked it to two other exhibitions currently on display: Trading in Death – the Final Mass Extinction? has the commercial interest and its impact on nature as a common denominator. Experiment Life – Gabonionta overlaps as it shows the oldest complex life forms known to man, which share the time and the place (Gabon, 2.1 billion years ago) of a highly above average activity in natural nuclear chain reactions similar to the counterparts in man-made reactors nowadays. Whether there is a causal link to the advent of the first complex, colonial organisms is unclear but interesting.

The museum can shape the context and thus shape perception. By putting three different, seemingly unrelated temporal exhibitions on at the same time, a very constructive overlapping is created – interferences come into being simply through putting three seemingly unrelated things next to each other.

The power of a book

Lois Lammerhuber (of the book’s publisher Edition Lammerhuber) recounted the media reception. Despite the lack of a Chernobyl jubilee, all the important news outlets had already covered the publication and exhibition. When he asked German state TV, who filmed for two hours in the exhibition, why they were doing it, they answered: »Weil ein Buch erscheint« (»because a book is being published«, where the German »erscheinen« can both refer to an »appearance« as well as an »epiphany«). Lammerhuber was visibly impressed by how he, in letting a book appear, can force something onto the agenda of a world that would otherwise not have taken notice at that point in time.

As the two preconditions he identified Ludwig’s willingness to commit to such a long term project and his capability to make something visible.

Making a difference

Gerd Ludwig gave a few insights into the way he works. Even though the subject of his images is suffering and destruction, the are aesthetically pleasing. Aesthetics to him is the grammar of photography.

He views the fact that he does not have to work under a tight time constraint as his biggest privilege because it means that he can talk first and then take the pictures. The trust he establishes through the conversations greatly helps reduce the momentary amplification of suffering he inevitably causes by taking a picture.

He finished by telling a story from Sicily: one night an enormous number of starfish were washed ashore. In the morning, when the sun rose, they started to dry out and die. The children of the village noticed and started carrying them back to the water. An older man from the village stood and watched and said: »you can’t save them all, your enterprise is futile – the little you can do doesn’t make a difference«. One child, holding up a single starfish, replied: »And yet for this one, it does make a difference«. Ludwig wants to be this child always.

Access to our World

Finally, the section chief Michael P. Franz closed the circle Christian Koeberl established by opening the exhibition with a Gottfried Boehm quote: an image, he says, pre-formulates the access to our world.

Project 12: Julia

posted in: 12, Photography, Portrait | 0

The (rather late) October portrait for »Project 12« was taken in January and finally edited only a few days ago. It is of Julia, who is not only a close friend, proper hiking buddy and HR professional but – and this points to the root of the lag – godmother to my daughter, who was born in November. Julia recently moved into a new flat and redecorated it, so we decided it was an suitable setting.

On new year’s eve she at one point donned a turban, looked stunning and someone took with a camera phone – and as we had the gear in place anyway we thought it was worth recreating the opportunity. At the end of our 5 hour session we were both pretty happy but also pretty knackered (and one of us still needed a haircut – desperately).

Project 12R: January

posted in: 12, Lifestyle, Photography, Portrait | 0

In 2014 »Project 12« gets a slightly different spin and is now »Project 12R«. The plan is to take 12 pictures of Rosina. Starting in February, we shoot one photo a month that derives its theme from the events of her preceding weeks.

 

The first installment involved a poster for a party that was stuck onto many distribution boxes. We narrowed it down to two location options that were close to each other: one spacious and quiet, the other at a busy tram stop in the middle of an equally busy crossroads. We decided to opt against comfort and for better looks, which unfortunately meant I had to shoot from the tracks with trains rattling in from three different directions by the minute. Thus, I was constantly shifting my light and tripod and Daniel, who was kind enough to act as assistant, not only patiently braved wind and coldness but in addition held on to the contraption for the black background with cars whooshing past very close by – thanks a lot Daniel!

Project 12: Rosina

posted in: 12, Photography, Portrait | 0

In September I photographed my friend Rosina for »Project 12«. It was a new experience in a couple of senses:

First of all, Rosina is a designer by profession and it was as interesting as instructive to take a picture of someone who is both meticulous and knowledgeable when it comes to composition, colours, set design and furniture. I enjoyed it tremendously as it allowed me to concentrate on the lighting.

Secondly, it was the first time I shot tethered, which meant we continuously discussed all changes, thus the final images really feel like a joint effort.

And finally (probably also a result from second), the approach was very methodical. Usually I move around quite a bit while shooting, but this time we first looked for a frame that worked, then nailed the tripod to the floor. Then moved furniture in and out, tried a bunch of clothes to match the environment etc. So in the end, we settled with just two shots: her favourite (first) and mine (second).

Wien Südbahnhof

posted in: Architecture, On the Road, Photography | 0

I spent New Year’s Eve with magician, architect and fellow photographer Sven Wuttej. Going through his images from the last day at Wien Südbahnhof reminded me of the pictures I took of the monumental old landmark when I still lived right across the road from the train station. Somehow I quite liked the architecture, and was hence rather sad to see it go. So here are a couple of images from the transition of the hood: »Wien Süd« to »Quartier Belvedere«.

The first few pictures, where the train station (if already partly demolished) is still busy are from August 2009. The ones of the gutted building I took in February 2010 and the last two, where nothing remains of the old glory, are from September 2010 (you can see the very last one with just a flat stretch of sand where the station once was in full size).

Theresa

posted in: 12, Commission, Photography, Portrait | 2

When I last photographed my friend Theresa, she had just secured her first job after graduation. A year later, the resourceful health and safety professional sticks to the good advice my friend Rob once expressed: the best time looking for a job is when you have one.

Since a picture is mandatory for almost all job applications in Austria, we put my spacious living room to good use one last time before I had to move out and shot some formal portraits. Luckily there’s also one to sneak into »Project 12«. This, that and the relocation got into the way, so it took me way too long before I managed to get round to editing (and seeing the barber).

Valentin Rosegger, Physiotherapist

My good friend and physiotherapist Valentin Rosegger is about to open his own practice and asked me to provide some visuals.

I gladly obliged, because in the past I received countless hours of Valentin’s skilled treatment and profound advice. Creating the images for his information material was a great way to repay the services (and I could also sneak in my – late – August portrait for »Project 12«).

If you are looking for a thorough physiotherapist, I really recommend him. He is setting up shop at Lindengasse 27 in 1070 Vienna and offers very work-compatible times. For an appointment dial +43 699 17161420.

Big thanks to Valentin Rosegger’s colleague Julian Gullner, who played the patient in a manner that can only be described as patiently. It involved holding a very strenuous position for a very long time (see above), neither minding Valentin (»straighten the back Julian, involve the abs a little more«) nor me (»great, stay just like this, only a few more shots, almost done«).

Project 12: Anke

posted in: 12, Photography, Portrait | 0

Since the beginning of the year Anke, who teaches German Literature at Vienna University, and me tried to put an idea for a portrait into practice, which for this, that and the other reason never quite happened.

So there was a vacancy in »project 12« since at least the beginning of 2013 – when, by the end of May, somehow several things just fell into place: a friend of ours gave Anke a bunch of hefty peonies in a colour she absolutely adored and that coincidentally also matched a dress in her wardrobe.

Furthermore, I had just bought her a used mini trampolin (after I had a go it unfortunately is now defunct) that coincidentally matched her urge to jump with joy after a streak of successful undertakings. And lastly, I had just thought up a contraption for a home grown diy beauty dish which I really wanted to try. And so it went and I am extremely happy about my wife finally being part of my project, too.

Project 12: Karin Peschka

posted in: 12, Editorial, Photography, Portrait | 1

In February this year, I met up with author Karin Peschka (whose story »Watschenmann« recently won the Wartholz-Literaturpreis) to discuss a portrait. We agreed to wait for spring and in mid May I took the Lilo to Eferding, where we were lucky enough to experience some of the rare sunny moments this year. After a lovely family lunch in a beautiful garden, we went over to the former family run restaurant and explored the house from top to bottom.

The building’s arresting atmosphere provided photographic opportunities galore, so we tried to realise a few, starting in the attic, working our way down through the kitchen into the basement and back up into the »green room« (where I also took the May-portrait for »Project 12«).

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